Low Water Pressure Causes & Solutions

There are many reasons why your plumbing system might be experiencing low water pressure problems. Knowing the causes and possible solutions can help you restore the trickle to a steady stream.

Water pressure problems may present themselves in various ways, all of which can be quite frustrating. Faucets may take a while to fill a sink or bathtub, or a showerhead may not give you that powerful shower you want. Your washing machine or dishwasher may take much longer to run a cycle than it should. When only one plumbing fixture has low water pressure, it’s likely that the issue can be solved if you just focus on fixing that one fixture. However, several broader plumbing issues can affect the water pressure to your entire home. If your household water pressure seems low, then the initial thing to do is to narrow down the cause.

Here are some of the causes of low water pressure with some possible solutions:

1. Debris, Mineral, and Corrosion Buildup in Pipes

The gradual buildup of sediment and minerals that begin coating the inside of your water pipes is what causes low water pressure in many homes. Even without a fractured line, your pipes are susceptible to mineral buildups from the deposits that water leaves behind when moving through your home, and especially if hard water is present in your area.

You can test this by comparing kitchen faucets to the bathroom, or laundry room or outdoor hose faucets. By doing this, you can determine the problem quickly. If it is generalized low pressure throughout the home, then there is another issue. Clogs hardly occur in multiple locations, and a pipe cleaning usually does the trick in building the power again.

2. Partially Shut Valves

Constant low water pressure throughout the home, or in central areas can indicate that a water valve has been slightly shut off, or is failing. Solve this issue by opening the valve fully, though replacement of the valve is rarely necessary. You can usually locate the water valve along the intake water lines near faucets and water outlets. Also, inspect the pressure release valve and main water valve as when restricted it can decrease the flow of water to a remarkable degree.

3. Insufficient Water Flow caused by Small Pipes

If your home has multiple bathrooms and a lot of people come in and out taking showers, using toilets and sinks simultaneously, then this can cause a dramatic decrease in water pressure. The best solution for this is to increase the size of the pipe that brings water into the house.

4. Hot Water Low Pressure

Are you frequently experiencing a low water pressure during times the hot water is in use? There is a water pressure valve found on the appliance that may be the culprit. Opening the device further will solve this issue. High demands for hot water may indicate that the pipes are too small to funnel the needed hot water or the unit itself is not providing enough hot water. A licensed and qualified plumber in Oregon can determine the cause and repair the problem.

5. Water Leaks

An unexpected and severe decrease in water pressure often means there is a critical water leak. You will need to inspect the water system of your home to identify if this is the case. Check the water meter and gradually work your way inside the house. Search for visible signs of water leaks and unusual areas of wet flooring. Running toilets can also induce a drop in water pressure. Ensure all water connections are tight, leak-free and operating as they should. Call a professional plumber in Washington and Nevada for an expert leak solution.

If low water pressure is making problems in your household, don’t just live with it. Stop waiting and solve this plumbing problem today with the help of a professional plumber. For help diagnosing your water pressure issues, just contact Einstein Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling at 888-671-7767 or email [email protected]. We have certified and licensed plumber and technicians ready to service your plumbing, water heating, heating & cooling, and sewer & mainline needs.

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